Stony Brook University yesterday celebrated the completion of Stony Brook Children’s Hospital with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Stony Brook Medicine campus.

Stony Brook Children’s Hospital provides cutting-edge research, child-sized technological innovations, clinical trials and breakthrough techniques to benefit pediatric patients, the university said in a press release.

Each room of the new hospital includes patient, family and healthcare provider areas. State-of-the-art hospital beds will capture and download patient information directly into the patients’ charts. Every room contains a proprietary security system, with interactive televisions, in-room refrigerators and kid-focused menus,” the release said.

The hospital has separate child and teen playrooms, as well as common areas, including an outdoor garden, and a classroom with wi-fi so students can keep up with their studies.

For family members and visitors, the hospital provides a new Ronald McDonald Family Room, courtesy of the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island, to offer a welcoming place for family respite, comfort and support.

The hospital’s design and amenities are supported by research that shows that a child-friendly environment contributes to better outcomes for children. Patient rooms include multi-colored wall lights controlled by patients, to give them a greater sense of control over their environment during what can be a frightening time for them and their families.

“Today we celebrate Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, where our youngest patients benefit from world-class healthcare,” Stony Brook University’s interim president Michael Bernstein said at the ribbon-cutting ceremony. “This beautiful new, state-of-the-art children’s hospital will expand Stony Brook’s capabilities to meet the growing healthcare needs of children and their families across Long Island.”

The hospital project received broad support from legislators, the community, civic organizations, schools and philanthropic organizations, as well as individual donors, the university said.

It was made possible by New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the State University of New York under the leadership of former Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher through a $35 million NYSUNY 2020 Challenge Grant, $50 million in State Senate funding for the hospital and the Medical and Research Translation (MART) building from Senators John Flanagan and Kenneth LaValle, and through $50 million in support from a historic $150 million gift from Jim and Marilyn Simons.

“I am pleased to continue my support of the children’s hospital,” Sen. Ken LaValle said. “It is critically important that families going through such an emotional time will receive cutting-edge healthcare close to their homes and their support systems. The facility is well on its way to becoming a preeminent children’s medical care provider in the region.”

A community open house is slated for Saturday, Nov. 2, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Photo caption: At the Stony Brook Children’s Hospital ribbon-cutting ceremony are, left to right front row: New York State Assemblyman Michael Fitzpatrick; Kevin Law, President of the Long Island Association and Chair of the Stony Brook Council; Kenneth Kaushansky MD, Senior Vice President, Health Sciences, and Dean, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University; New York State Senator Kenneth P. LaValle; SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson; Michael Bernstein, PhD, Interim President, Stony Brook University; David and Michele Knapp from the Knapp Swezey and Island Outreach Foundations; New York State Senator John Flanagan; Peg McGovern, MD, PhD, Knapp Professor of Pediatrics and Physician-in-Chief, Stony Brook Children’s Hospital; Brookhaven Town Councilwoman Valerie Cartright, and Lisa Santeramo, Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs, representing New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.

Source: Stony Brook University press release issued Oct. 17, 2019

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