Dr. Lindsey works on her teddy bear, Peeps, during the surgical part of the Teddy Bear Clinic. According to Lindsey's paperwork, Peeps will need to rest for 10 days and receive 100 hugs per day in order to recover fully from his leg injury. Courtesy photo

Kindergarten students at the Roanoke Avenue Elementary School got some important lessons on safety from Kristi Ladowski, MPH, an Injury Prevention and Outreach Coordinator from the Trauma Center at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital when she visited their classroom last week.

Ladowski stressed to the kindergartners the importance of buckling up whenever they get into the car–no matter how short the trip. She underlined the importance of using car seats and/or booster seats for children 8 years old and younger because the booster seats help raise kids up so seat belts fit safely.

 Ms. Landowowski and the students watched as two of their classmates drop an egg in a baggie to demonstrate the difference a helmet (even for an egg) makes in keeping the head/brain safe.
Ms. Landowowski and the students watched as two of their classmates drop an egg in a baggie to demonstrate the difference a helmet (even for an egg) makes in keeping the head/brain safe.

Ladowski also showed the students how important it is to use a helmet while skating, snowboarding, skiing, riding a bicycle, or playing many sports because helmets reduce the risk of head injury by 85%, according the statistics presented by Stony Brook Trauma Center. She used a helmet designed to illustrate what happens to your brain during a head injury. Then, two students dropped raw eggs in baggies to demonstrate the difference a helmet (even for an egg) makes in keeping the head/brain safe.

Dr. Cameron treats his puppy dog's injured foot.
Dr. Cameron treats his puppy dog’s injured foot.

The last part of the presentation was probably the most fun for the students as they donned surgical masks and gloves and went to work on treating imaginary injuries to their teddy bears and stuffed animals. But there’s a real life reason behind the make-believe: the teddy bear clinic is designed to help ease possible fears the children might have about visiting a doctor’s office or going to a hospital. The students taped up noses, tummies, arms, wrists and legs of their “patients.”

Finally, just like real doctors, the kids had to do their medical paperwork explaining what the injury was, how it occurred and how they treated it.

Kindergarten teacher Anselma Jimenez (seated far left with her students) and Teacher Assistant Marisa Mullane (middle in blue) with their kindergarten students. Also pictured in the back: L-R Dr. Noah Jablow, Kristi Landowski, MPH and Dr. Anupa Dalel from Stony Brook Trauma Center and Hospital. Courtesy photo
Kindergarten teacher Anselma Jimenez (seated far left with her students) and Teacher Assistant Marisa Mullane (middle in blue) with their kindergarten students. Also pictured in the back: L-R Dr. Noah Jablow, Kristi Landowski, MPH and Dr. Anupa Dalel from Stony Brook Trauma Center and Hospital.
Courtesy photo

Source: Riverhead Central School District. 

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